On April 9, 2020, the governor suspended certain statutes concerning appearance before a notary public to execute a self-proved will, a durable power of attorney, a medical power of attorney, a directive to physician, or an oath of an executor, administrator, or guardian. These suspensions temporarily allow for appearance before a notary public via videoconference when executing such documents, avoiding the need for in-person contact during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The following conditions will apply whenever this suspension is invoked:

A notary public shall verify the identity of a person signing a document at the time the signature is taken by using two-way video and audio conference technology.

A notary public may verify identity by personal knowledge of the signing person, or by analysis based on the signing person’s remote presentation of a government-issued identification credential, including a passport or driver’s license, that contains the signature and a photograph of the person.

The signing person shall transmit by fax or electronic means a legible copy of the signed document to the notary public, who may notarize the transmitted copy and then transmit the notarized copy back to the signing person by fax or electronic means, at which point the notarization is valid.


Continue Reading Notary Services In A World of Social Distancing: Texas Temporarily Allows For Videoconference Notarization In Addition To Online Notary Services

Upcoming Webinar

David F. Johnson, lead writer for the Texas Fiduciary Litigator blog,  will address beneficiaries requesting loans from trustees. There are multiple issues that arise regarding the trustee’s authority to do so under the trust’s language and statutory and common law, and the loan’s impact on duties

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I.     Introduction

In fiduciary litigation, parties often file motions that raise important legal issues before trial. For example, parties may file motions on preemption, the statute of limitations, exculpatory clauses, legal duties, legal construction of documents, etc. One party or the other may want to appeal a trial court’s decision on these important legal issues

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Upcoming Webinar

Join us for a complimentary webinar on the enforceability of arbitration, forum-selection, and jury-waiver clauses in trust and will disputes. We will also discuss other related issues associated with these litigation-altering clauses such as common defenses, standards for enforcement, and potential forms for these clauses.

Date: Tuesday, February 18,

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