objection to personal jurisdiction

In Alexander v. Marshall, the original trustee was the beneficiary’s mother and the wife of the beneficiary’s father, who was the settlor. No. 14-18-00425-CV, 2021 Tex. App. LEXIS 1952 (Tex. App.—Houston [14th Dist.] March 16, 2021, no pet. history). In December 2016, the original trustee appointed Louisiana residents as co-trustees of the trusts and signed appointment documents in Texas. The Louisiana co-trustees each signed acceptance documents in Louisiana. All of the co-trustees testified that they knew, at or around the time of their appointments, that the beneficiary was a Texas resident. The trust beneficiary sued the co-trustees for a declaratory judgment that the appointment of the co-trustees and their compensation scheme violated the terms of the trust instruments and that they aided and abetted the original trustee in breaches of duties. The Louisiana co-trustees objected to the Texas court’s personal jurisdiction over them and filed special appearances. The trial court overruled those objections, and they appealed.
Continue Reading Co-Trustees Who Managed A Texas Trust With A Texas Beneficiary Had Sufficient Contacts With Texas To Be Subject To A Texas Court’s Personal Jurisdiction

In Hanschen v. Hanschen, a trustee challenged a default judgment. No. 05-19-01134-CV, 2020 Tex. App. LEXIS 4075 (Tex. App.—Dallas May 28, 2020, no pet. history). The family sued the trustee in his personal capacity and in his capacity as trustee for breaching fiduciary duties. While the trustee was in Texas, the family served him

In Turman v. POS Partners, LLC, a Texas employer asserted contract and breach-of-fiduciary-duty claims against a former Oklahoma employee. No. 14-17-00105-CV, 2018 Tex. App. LEXIS 95 (Tex. App.—Houston [14th Dist.] January 4, 2018). The defendant asserted a special appearance objecting to the Texas court’s exercise of personal jurisdiction over him. The trial court denied

In Happy vs. Tanner, Tanner sued Retire Happy for breach of fiduciary duty, negligent misrepresentation, fraud, conversion, negligence, promissory estoppel, quantum meruit, and violation of the Texas Securities Act arising from Retire Happy, a Nevada entity, inducing Tanner, a Texas resident, to unsuccessfully invest funds with another Nevada corporation known as the Horizon Group.